Another successful ph.d-seminar in DHT

by Roligen T. Thirstrup

DHT participants 2015. Photo by Roligen T. Thirstrup

DHT participants 2015. Photo by Roligen T. Thirstrup

Experienced scientists and ph.d-students from different countries met sunday May 10th at the airport for further transportation to Søminen – an old military marine base that has been rebuilt to a seminar and conference center. Ahead of them awaited a two day seminar within the field of Designing Human Technologies.

DHT participants waiting in the Copenhagen airport. Photo by Roligen T. Thirstrup

DHT participants waiting in the Copenhagen airport. Photo by Roligen T. Thirstrup

The program for the seminar consisted of academic discussions with topics such as Participatory design & Materiality initiated by Mette Agger Eriksen from Malmö University and Designing for Ubiquitous Interactions presented by David Lamas from Tallinn University. Apart from the scientific work, there was also time for the participants to enjoy the surrounding forest and beach area. Each night after a day of presentations and group work, many of the participants continued their academic talks with each other over a glass of wine.

DHT partiicipants at the evening reception. Photo by Roligen T. Thirstrup

DHT partiicipants at the evening reception. Photo by Roligen T. Thirstrup

There was generally a great atmosphere during the seminar and some of the participants even expressed their interest for the next Designing Human Technology seminar.

We asked one of the participants, a ph.d-student from the University of Dundee, Katerina Gorkovenko, to tell os about her experience of the ph.d-seminar, and she sent os these following words.

“ The Design Human Technologies Course was an incredible experience that helped me discuss my work, learn about what others are doing, network and reflect. I am 6 months into my PhD and this is the first event that I have attended in relation to my studies. Before I arrived at the Søminestationen field station I was quite worried that the feedback I get would be critical rather than constructive but the experience itself turned out to be so incredibly calm and relaxed. The activities we did throughout the day had a strict schedule that included meals, lectures, and group discussions. Everyone’s work had about an hour dedicated time which included a small presentation, questions and reflections.

 The biggest surprise about the course had to do with the accommodation and food that we were given for free. The building in which we slept may have been an old military base once upon a time but it is now a cozy renovated dorm. The bedrooms either looked out into the forest or onto the stunning sea side. Being so far away from the city meant that the only sounds you could hear throughout the day were those of the hundreds of birds around. To top it off for breakfast lunch and dinner were absolutely amazing. The chef would come out and present each dish telling us about the locally sourced ingredients. Each night would end with hours and hours of casual conversation around the dinner tables. Everyone would occasionally shift from table to table in order to speak with as many people as possible. The atmosphere that the location and people created made this course unlike anything I have ever encountered. DHT 2015 has set the bar high for the PhD event community. “, writes Katerina Gorkovenko from the University of Dundee.

Lisa Haskel from Bournemouth University, UK describes her experience with the DHT seminar as following: “It was one of the best education-related experience I ever had” “As well as being a friendly and inspiring gathering, the feedback from peers and experts was invaluable in helping me find the way forward for writing up my doctoral work”

Below are pictures of some of the participants engaging in group work at the Sømine.

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Related posts

*DHT phD course 2015

*DHT 2.0: PhD seminar in May

*PhD Course: Designing Human Technologies 2013

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